Monthly Archives: April 2018

How to approach student loans with your kids

University is always going to be at least partially a  both for prospective students and their parents, or whoever they rely on financially. Calculating the rising total bill for tuition fees and cost of living for a degree course can make university seem like an impossibility for some. But it’s essential that all involved carry out proper research into the cost of higher education before making a decision about the future, rather than letting sensationalist reporting in the media surrounding student debt scare them away. Continue reading

The upsides and downsides of downsizing

Row of typical English terraced houses in West Hampstead, London

If your family has grown up and flown the nest and you’re moving closer to retiring, it’s likely that you’ve at least thought about downsizing your home. For some it can be for practical reasons, for others it might be a desire to be closer to their children if they’ve relocated, for others still it might simply be the desire for a change of scenery as they move into the next chapter of their life. But there are pros and cons to downsizing which need to be considered before you make what is always going to be a fairly major personal and financial decision. Continue reading

What is pound cost averaging?

If you’re unclear on what the term ‘pound cost averaging’ means, the simplicity of what it describes is perhaps best demonstrated through an example. Abbie is an investor who has already decided where she wants to make a long-term investment. She also earns money through her job and invests more each month. Abbie therefore has three options as to how to invest her money. Firstly, she could invest all the money she currently has immediately, then invest the rest as she earns it. Alternatively, Abbie could hold on to her investment money and add to it as she earns more, waiting for the optimum time to invest a larger sum all in one go. Abbie’s third option is to stagger her investment, pacing herself so that the money is invested gradually over time. Continue reading

What does GDPR mean and how does it affect me?

GDPR is one of those acronyms you’re probably hearing a lot about at the moment. You’re no doubt receiving a high number of emails asking if you’re still happy to receive communications from a company and to be on their database. So what are the reasons behind this? In 2016, a bill was passed by the European Union introducing the Global Data Protection Regulation, which will come into force as of 25th May 2018. GDPR defines the legal rights of EU citizens in relation to their data, and enforces regulations on the data controllers and processors who hold that data. Continue reading

What is the tapered annual allowance and how could it affect you?

One of the key advantages of saving for your retirement through a pension scheme is the tax relief you receive on the money you contribute, usually available at your usual rate of tax. The ‘Annual Allowance’ limits the amount of contributions both you and your employer can make to your pension in a year which benefit from tax relief, and is currently set at £40,000. Continue reading

How the gender gap hits women’s retirement savings as well as pay

A recent study has found women are generally less well prepared for retirement compared to men. The research, carried out by savings company Standard Life, reveals that whilst over half (55%) of men own a pension, this figure falls to just over a third (36%) in women. Even more alarmingly, more than seven in ten (71%) of women stated that they did not know how to start a pension. Continue reading

What is a ‘market correction’?

macro close up of different color oil paint. colourful acrylic. modern art concept

The start of 2018 has been an eventful time in the world of the stock market. After hitting highs at the end of January, both the Dow Jones and Standard & Poor’s 500 saw a considerable drop at the start of February, a fall from which the markets have now mostly recovered. At the time, however, this was reported as a ‘market correction’ by most media outlets. But what exactly does a correction mean in this context? Continue reading

Emerging markets: looking back on 2017 and forward on 2018

2017 was a good year for Emerging Markets, which continued their recent strong run, keeping them on track to outperform Developed Markets in back-to-back years for the first time since 2009/10. Compared to 2016, which offered only marginal outperformance thanks to the election result in the US in November causing a sharp market correction, the performance throughout 2017 was relatively much stronger. Continue reading

April Market Commentary

To say that March was a busy month is an understatement.

Russia went to the polls to elect a new President and, in the least surprising result of the year, Vladimir Putin won another six year term. With the Chinese Communist Party removing the rules limiting Xi Jinping to two terms in office, two of the world’s three superpowers now effectively have presidents for life. North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un, jumped on the train and headed to Beijing for talks, ahead of his meetings with Moon Jae-in, the South Korean leader, and with Donald Trump. Presumably Kim and Xi Jinping did not discuss sanctions: China is supposedly imposing harsh UN sanctions on North Korea – and yet Kim saw his economy grow by more than 3% last year. ‘Curious and curious-er’ as Alice would have said. Continue reading